Europe's dilemmas by Janos Martonyi
07/07/2016
Videos
Former Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs talking about Europe's dilemmas.
The future of the European project is arguably more uncertain than at any time since its inception with the creation of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) in 1951, and the European Economic Community (EEC) in 1958.
 
In the wake of financial, currency and debt crises, and wrenching budget and spending cuts, has come the crisis caused by mass immigration. 
 
On 23rd June 2016, Britain, the fifth largest economy in the world and the second biggest net contributor to the EU budget, will vote on whether to remain a member of the European Union.   
 
Political opinion is divided between those who believe that the answer to Europe’s problems lies in further economic and political integration, and those who believe that it is the drive to ever closer union that is primarily responsible for the present crises, and that radical reform is therefore required. There are also sharp divergences of opinion between those who believe that the EU has contributed to European security, and those who attribute the peace and stability enjoyed by Europe to the existence of NATO.
 
What are Europe’s economic prospects, and what can be done to improve them? Can the EU be reformed in a way that produces greater democratic accountability as well conditions for economic growth? Has the EU helped the peace in Europe?  If Britain votes to leave, will this force leaders to set a new course that respects the sovereignty of nation states, or, having rid itself of a country which was always ambivalent about the European project and perpetually dragged its feet, will the EU embark on a more rapid and smoother process of integration?
 
At an international DI conference on 27th May 2016, a distinguished speakers’ panel, including former economic and foreign ministers, policy analysts, and commentators discussed these and related issues. The conference was chaired by former Hungarian Foreign Minister János Martonyi, and former British Chancellor of the Exchequer Norman Lamont.

The New Geopolitics Of The Middle East

Date: 21/02/2018 5:00 p.m.
Location: Danube Institute, 1067 Budapest, Eötvös utca 24
A presentation by Professor David Newman on the Geopolitical Dynamics and Border Changes in the Israel/Palestine Conflict.

MCC Neighbourhood Dialogues 2018

Future events

Conference about The role of the V4 countries in the future of the EU.

Germany Between Elections and a New Government: ‘Encore’ or New Casting?

Date: 13/02/2018 4:00 p.m.
Location: 24 Eötvös u., 1067 Budapest
A debate on the German political landscape in 2018 at the Danube Institue, on February 13.

Austrian Economics Meeting Europe: Call for Papers

Future events

The Austrian Economics Meeting Europe invites young scholars to next year's meeting in Budapest.

Danube Institute Internship Programme ⁄ Ösztöndíj

Internship

The Danube Institute invited applications for its four-month internship programme starting in February 2018.

Autonomy or secession: the case of Catalonia

Date: 29/11/2017 4:00 p.m.
Location: 1067 Budapest, Eötvös u. 24., Danube Institute
What theoretical and practical implications does the Catalan example have for Spain and Europe? A discussion at the Danube Institute.

100th Anniversary of the Russian Revolution

Date: 09/11/2017 1:00 p.m.
Location: Budapest, Horánszky u. 20, 1085 - Párbeszéd Háza
On November 9, Danube Institute held an international conference on the Russian Revolution.

The EU and Israel: an uneasy relationship

Date: 13/11/2017 2:30 p.m.
Location: Eötvös u. 24, Budapest, Danube Institute
Professor Eytan Gilboa (Israel Public Diplomacy Forum) and Dr. István Gyarmati (ICDT) talked about the Middle East.

Making Hungarians, Making Europeans: Problems, Solutions

Past Events

A mini-conference on demography at the Danube Institute on October 25.

Conference on today's warfare and insecurity

Past Events

Understanding hybrid threats and managing insecurity in 21st century. Conference on 18 October at the MTA in Budapest.

MAP

H-1067 Budapest, Eötvös u. 24.
Phone: +36 1 269 1041
E-mail:info@danubeinstitute.hu
www.danubeinstitute.hu


Switch to a larger map

Events